CINDERELLA’S BALL GOWN AND GLASS SLIPPER FROM DISNEY’S 2015 FILM

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Sandy Powell has won three Academy Awards®

The Young Victoria
The Aviator
Shakespeare in Love

And been nominated for an Oscar® seven additional times

Orlando
The Wings of the Dove
Velvet Goldmine
Gangs of New York
Mrs. Henderson Presents
The Tempest
Hugo

Copyright: Disney

 

The shimmering blue ball gown in which Ella makes her entrance to the grand palace ball in Disney’s recent live-action feature inspired by the classic fairy tale, Cinderella, will be on special display throughout this year’s Port Eliot Festival.

Accompanying the gown will be the sparkling glass slipper which Ella, played by Lily James, loses on the palace staircase as she escapes the ball at a minute to midnight.

At Port Eliot, Ella’s ball gown will be on display in the blue Drawing Room, with the slipper shown alone in an adjoining darkened room, which will be lit by the torchlight of festivalgoers as they enter.

Multi Oscar®-winning costume designer Sandy Powell, who created the costumes for the film, will be reunited with the gown and slipper at Port Eliot. As well as discussing her Cinderella designs, in conversation with Tim Blanks, editor-at-large of Style.com, Sandy Powell will give an insight into her latest work for Carol, starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, her third film with director Todd Haynes, which received high praise at the recent Cannes Film Festival. At Port Eliot, Ella’s ball gown will be on display in the blue Drawing Room, with the slipper shown alone in an adjoining darkened room, which will be lit by the torchlight of festivalgoers as they enter.
For Cinderella, she began working on ideas for the characters’ looks almost two years before the start of principal photography on the film, aiming for a 1940s version of a 19th-century style. Powell said, “I really wanted the film to have that ‘once upon a time’ feel to it, and since this is a fairy tale, we didn’t have to adhere to any rules.”

Powell said, “I really wanted the film to have that ‘once upon a time’ feel to it, and since this is a fairy tale, we didn’t have to adhere to any rules.”

As for the glass slipper, Sandy Powell had to attempt to create an item for which the use of the word ‘iconic’ is, for once, merited. “I looked at lots of different possibilities of how to do a glass shoe, and realized the most important thing was that it had to sparkle, which meant that it had to be made of crystal because glass would not sparkle,” she says. “I knew the shape of the shoe that I wanted, which was in fact based on an original shoe from the 1890s that I found in a Northampton shoe museum…the shoe was impossibly tiny with a 5-inch heel and was simply elegant.” 

The film’s director, Kenneth Branagh, added, “Sandy produced a really fascinating 3D shoe that was shaped and faceted so it had this crystal glass look that meant at any given angle, shards of light and refracted, coloured reflections would shine off it, and you could feel this richness, this magic, this dynamism, in the shoe.”